Recital for Broadstairs Music Recital Society

Just ready to rehearse at Broadstairs

Sunday 17th February 2013. 3pm. At the Methodist Church, York Street, Broadstairs.

Violin – Midori Komachi. Viola – Diana Mathews

Michael Alec Rose ‘Unturned Stones’ (2012) (World Premiere)

A real privilege to have given the World Premiere of ‘Unturned Stones’ by our good friend Michael Rose. Here are his words on it:
The old saying “to leave no stone unturned” has always honoured the virtue of studying a landscape so thoroughly that nothing about it remains unexposed to the observer’s scientific inquiry.  Such an admirable accumulation of knowledge applies to landscapes of various sorts: physical, psychological, musical, and so on.  But there is a different kind of honouring, a spiritual hunch that it might be best to leave things alone, without imposing our own wills upon them.  Where I live, in middle Tennessee, it’s impossible to turn over any stone in a cedar glade without uncovering a lizard, snake, or colony of insects.  In this teeming context, the virtue of leaving stones unturned seems pretty clear.

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Michael-Rose-Unturned-Stones-1st-mvt.mp3|titles=Michael Rose Unturned Stones for Violin and Viola First Movement. Midori Komachi – Violin, Diana Mathews – Viola. Recorded Live 17.2.13]

In my own UNTURNED STONES, an implacable feeling of “movement” itself governs the changeable character of the first movement, whose epigraph “Eppur si muove” (“And yet it moves”) was muttered by a beleaguered Galileo under his breath to affirm the inexorable turning of the Earth around the Sun.  How unnatural it would be to be to refrain from turning stones when the stone called Earth is always, always turning herself!

Michael Alec Rose

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Michael-Rose-Unturned-Stones-2nd-mvt.mp3|titles=Michael Rose Unturned Stones Second Movement. Midori Komachi – Violin, Diana Mathews – Viola. Recorded Live 17.2.13]

And yet, and yet…there is another way, a counterpoint to the relentless pull of knowing things.  Zen masters have given various names to this alternative path.  I like to call it “A Courtesy Towards Being” (the title of my second movement).  Here, the extroverted force that nourished the unease of the violin and viola in the previous movement now turns inward, so that the two instruments not only sing with each other, nor merely to each other, but as one.  Being courteous towards another person has always been a fantastical challenge for every person, whether saint or sinner.  How much more wild and implausible a notion it is to be courteous to a stone.  I know I am not capable of it.  But my music hopes to be.

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Michael-Rose-Unturned-Stones-3rd-mvt.mp3|titles=Michael Rose Unturned Stones Third Movement. Midori Komachi – Violin, Diana Mathews – Viola. Recorded Live 17.2.13]

That is why the third movement bears the title “Coming Home to the World”: a movement to grasp the fact that we belong in the world, that the universe is our home address and there is no need to forward ourselves to any other.  This homecoming is just as uneasy as the first movement, but in a new key.  To be astonished is never a simple matter, least of all when the feeling arises from simple matter.  From stones.  From sounds. From the playing of Diana Mathews and Midori Komachi, to whom I am so grateful for so beautifully singing my turning and unturning songs of the earth.

Mozart Duo in B Flat Major KV424

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Mozart-B-flat-2nd-mvt.mp3|titles=Mozart Duo in B Flat Major KV424 Second Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola]

Ignaz Pleyel

Ignaz Pleyel (1757-1851) Grand Duo Op. 69 No. 1

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Pleyel-Op.-69-No.-1-1st-mvt.mp3|titles=Pleyel Op. 69 No. 1 First Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola] [audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Pleyel-Op.-69-No.-12nd-mvt.mp3|titles=Pleyel Op. 69 No. 1 Second Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola]

Bohuslav Martinu

Bohuslav Martinu (1890-1959) Duo No. 2

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Martinu-Duo-No.-2-1st-mvt.mp3|titles=Martinu Duo No. 2 First Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola] [audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Martinu-Duo-No.-2-2nd-mvt.mp3|titles=Martinu Duo No. 2 Second Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola] [audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Martinu-Duo-No.-2-3rd-mvt.mp3|titles=Martinu Duo No. 2 Third Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola]

Darius Milhaud

Milhaud (1892-1974) Sonatine for Violin and Viola

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Milhaud-Sonatine-1st-mvt.mp3|titles=Milhaud Sonatine for Violin and Viola First Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola] [audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Milhaud-Sonatine-2nd-mvt.mp3|titles=Milhaud Sonatine for Violin and Viola Second Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola] [audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Milhaud-Sonatine-3rd-mvt.mp3|titles=Milhaud Sonatine for Violin and Viola Third Movement. Recorded Live 17/2/13. Midori Komachi – Violin. Diana Mathews – Viola]

Johan Halvorsen

Halvorsen (1864-1935) Passacaglia on a theme by Handel. Halvorsen was a Norwegian Violinist, conductor and pedagogue who married grieg’s niece.

Jean Sibelius

Sibelius’ (1865-1957) Duo in C major was composed when he was about 26/27 years old.

[audio:http://www.diana-mathews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Sibelius-Duo-in-C-major.mp3|titles=Sibelius Duo in C major for violin and viola]

Beginning of the Concert at Broadstairs